Yonkers

Destiny –without an e​

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I grew up as a working class kid in Yonkers, New York. My parents sent me to Catholic schools, where I learned equal doses of discipline and terror. I spent my third and fourth grade in public school where all of my friends were Jewish. My teacher, Mrs. Chachkes, came from a Jewish merchant family that lived in south Yonkers and sold furniture.  She wore her blonde hair parted on the side in a soft wave that had the tendency to fall forward and cover her left eye.  She told me that I could rhyme well and master long words with complex meanings. She told me I was a natural born writer.

By the time I returned to Catholic school, I had a nun instruct the class to write a poem without using the letter e. No one could do it except for me. After I turned in my poem,...

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Latest Posts in Yonkers

How many times can your heart get broken?

Just in time for Valentine’s Day…How many times can your heart get broken? This question is asked by fifteen-year-old Cookie Colangelo in The Heart of Yonkers.


NOTES FROM THE WORKING-CLASS: Wipe Out

My neighborhood in the north end, called Down the End by the locals, trilled and thrummed with the unerring twang of guitars. Every boy on the block, talented or not, musically inclined or musically challenged, had mastered the three simple chords to play Wipe Out on the guitar with unerring frequency, regardless of the season or the time of day. From garages and basements, yards, parks and parking lots, impromptu jam sessions broke out into the ubiquitous street sound of drums humping under the sturm and drang of electric guitars. 


NOTES FROM THE WORKING-CLASS: Kids Like Us

Patricia Vaccarino writes about William “Bill” Powers who lived about thirty miles northwest of Denver in Longmont, a town famous for its craft breweries. Although Bill lived in Colorado, he never forgot his hometown Yonkers.


Remembering First Seasons

My memories of first seasons started with my family’s move to Yonkers, New York, when I was 6 years old. During the post-war baby boom, many families took advantage of purchasing their first homes and beginning to live the American Dream. And so that was how we came to live in this small suburb. My parents would purchase this—the only house they would ever own.


NOTES FROM THE WORKING-CLASS: Perfetto

When I was in Rome last November, I drifted to sleep at night listening to the sound of competing sirens. One night I had a dream about Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese. They weren’t doing much in my dream, just hanging out on the streets of Yonkers, the same way I used to hang out on the streets of Yonkers when I was a kid.