Environmental Justice for All

The September Magazine, Environmental Justice For All, homes in on the communities of color, tribal and indigenous communities, and economically depressed areas that have been “targeted” as sites for chemical plants, refineries, pipelines, landfills – the kinds of enterprises that generate toxic waste.


50 Days and Counting

As the 19th anniversary of 9/11 rolled around, I wanted to check whether progress had been made on the four unimplemented 9/11 Commission Report recommendations that I have been tracking since 2004. Unsurprisingly, the answer remains the same. 


Three WW II Books Mirror Our Current World Conflicts

World War II ended 75 years ago, the problems that it left behind, displaced immigrants, lack of international law, and the use of nuclear weapons, are all still with us.


A Strategic Plan for the Year 3000? Surely, You’re Joking!

The first five million years of our evolution went very well, overall. The next 980 years could be a problem.


Free Online Resources Supporting Entrepreneurial Success

When starting up a business it can be hard to know where to begin. There are many things to consider including who to turn to for the right advice or which tools you’ll need to succeed. Additionally, what kind of networks are important to your business and how do you plan for long term success?


Fear Not!! Jeffrey Gurian is at it again!

Jeffrey Gurian’s latest book is exactly what we need during this surreal time of intense fear and loathing. 


Libraries We Love –The Ernie Pyle Library

The key to understanding people and the world around us begins with education. One way to learn about the world is by developing a love of books. Each month, we profile a library. Large, small, urban, rural, post-modern, quaint or neo-classic; do you have a library that you love? Tell us about it. This month, Patricia Vaccarino writes about the Ernie Pyle Library in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 


Rachel Baucom | My Job is to Teach

Rachel Baucom often toils in her garden under the hot sun of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A school teacher by trade and by calling, her summers are short and intensely hot. She’s back in the classroom early in August, where she teaches a first-grade class at a public school. Most of her children are from families who are Hispanic and among the working-poor. The parents of her children are service workers and during the pandemic are considered essential employees. Some parents work as teachers and health care workers. Others are housekeepers or are employed as fast food workers, custodians and construction workers. Rachel is very concerned about returning to the classroom and being able to ensure safety, for her kids, their families, and for herself and her family—the entire community.